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April 2017

Black Soul Science > 2017 > April (Page 16)

Library Of Congress And Smithsonian Team Up To Buy Rare Photo Of Harriet Tubman

[ad_1] Source: The Washington Post / Getty With photos of Harriet Tubman being few and far between, when a rare new photo of her surfaced it was a huge deal. While most photos depict Tubman as an elderly woman, a newly unearthed picture shows a much younger Tubman and was quickly acquired by the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African-American History and Culture. It’s part of a 44-photo collection that also includes the only known photo of John Willis Menard, the first African-American man elected to the U.S. Congress. “We are so thrilled.The institutions have agreed to joint ownership and will digitize the...

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Oleebo Prepared A Rap About The New Film, “Boss Baby” [EXCLUSIVE]

[ad_1] Oleebo was so moved by the film, “Boss Baby,” he had a rap prepared about it. Click on the audio player to hear more in this exclusive clip from The Russ Parr Morning Show. Also On Black America Web: 24 Celebrity Instagrams You Missed This Week (3/18/-3/24) 24 photos Launch gallery 1. Kevin Hart Source:Instagram 1 of 24 2. LL Cool J Source:Instagram 2 of 24 3. Kandi Source:Instagram 3 of 24 4. Tiny Source:Instagram 4 of 24 5. Tank Source:Instagram 5 of 24 6. Jamie Foxx Source:Instagram 6 of 24 7. Vivica Fox Source:Instagram 7 of 24 8. Terrence J Source:Instagram 8 of 24 9. Trina Source:Instagram 9 of 24 10. Rick Ross Source:Instagram 10 of 24 11. Dwyane Wade Source:Instagram 11 of 24 12. Marlon Wayans Source:Instagram 12 of 24 13. Vanessa Bell Calloway Source:Instagram 13 of 24 14. Sommore Source:Instagram 14...

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What's Hollywood got against Latinos?

[ad_1] Latinos remain over-represented among frequent moviegoers relative to their overall percentage in the US population. Their attendance has been trending upward for years: from 2015 to 2016 it grew from 7.9 million to 8.3 million (its all-time high was 11.6 million, in 2013). Similarly, during 2015-2016, attendance for African-American frequent moviegoers grew from 3.8 million to 5.6 million; for Asian-American frequent moviegoers, it rose from 3.2 million to 3.9 million. Put another way, in 2016, Hispanics comprised 18% of the US population, but over-indexed at 23% of frequent moviegoers. African-Americans and Asians combined represent 20% of the...

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